7 Up: Originally an Antidepressant

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Originally posted: https://mcgill.ca/oss/article/did-you-know-history/7-was-originally-antidepressant

When 7 Up was originally placed on the market (In 1929), it was named Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda- a much less catchy, though more descriptive name. The ‘lithiated’ in the name came from the soda’s ingredient lithium citrate, a compound used to treat patients with mental health problems like bipolar disorder, depression or mania. 

The soda went through a name change to 7 Up Lithiated Lemon Soda, before finally settling on just 7 Up, and a formula with no added lithium. The 7 in the name has no confirmed source, but several theories about its origin. Some soda fans claim that it is derived from the 7 ingredients used in the original recipe, others from the soda having a pH of 7 (which is not true), and others think that the 7 originates from the lithium in the original formula, as this element has an atomic mass of ~7.

The Root in Root Beer is Sassafras

Originally posted here: https://mcgill.ca/oss/article/did-you-know/root-root-beer-sassafras

Unless you’re participating in a spelling bee or playing Fallout New Vegas, you probably don’t think about sassafras much, but you might still ingest it regularly. It is, or at least once was, the main flavourful ingredient in root beer.

Sassafras (a tree) and sarsaparilla (a vine) were traditionally used–along with other substances like licorice root, mint, nutmeg, and more–to flavour root beer. Recipes for root beer similar to what we know today date back to 1860, and sassafras root beverages date back even further, made by indigenous peoples for medicinal and culinary purposes.

But modern root beer doesn’t contain any real sassafras root anymore, why not?

Well, sassafras and sarsaparilla both contain safrole, a compound recently banned by the FDA due to its carcinogenic effects. Safrole was found tocontribute to liver cancer in rats when given in high doses, and thus it and sassafras or sarsaparilla-containing products were banned.

But more recent studies have actually failed to find evidence that the effects seen in rats occur in humans. This, and the fact that several other (still legal) foods, like the aforementioned nutmeg, also contain safrole, makes the ban seem less science based and more the result of fear.

So, modern root beer is flavoured most often with artificial sassafras, though sometimes with safrole-free sassafras too. More important than checking the safrole content of your beverage, though, might be checking the alcohol content. Traditional root beer was usually alcoholic, whereas modern root beer is rarely fortified with ethanol and is a favourite of kids everywhere.